Whittlesey-WhittelseyFamilyHistory
Genealogy of the Whittlesey-Whittelsey family based upon the 1855 Memorials of the Whittlesey Family, the 1898, 1941 and 1992 Whittelsey/Whittlesey Genealogies along with input from family members. In addition there is information on the Descendants of Seth Savage of Berlin, Connecticut
Additional family lineage of Willis Savage Whittlesey III can be found at cravendescendants.org; brownedescendants.org and frisbiedescendants.org
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Notes


Matches 161 to 200 of 1,014

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
161 Alison Family Tree on Ancestry.com ALISON, Alexander III (I29697)
 
162 Alison Family Tree on Ancestry.com ALISON, Alexander Gerrish (I29698)
 
163 Alison Family Tree on Ancestry.com ALISON, George Gerrish (I29699)
 
164 Alison Family Tree on Ancestry.com ALISON, Alexander Jr (I29700)
 
165 Alison Family Tree on Ancestry.com SMITH, Katherine Anna (I29701)
 
166 Alive in 1900 census GRUBB, Elno L (I8658)
 
167 Alive in 1900 census GRUBB, Burt Ira (I8659)
 
168 Alive in 1900 census GRUBB, Glen Vernon (I8660)
 
169 Alive in 1900 census GRUBB, Ford Sorrick (I8661)
 
170 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. WHITTLESEY, Jane (I11)
 
171 Also baptized 28 Jul 1870 EH IGI

Mary listed as widow 14 Dec 1765, age 63, New Haven 1st Congreg. Church.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized 28 Jul 1870 EH IGI

Mary listed as widow 14 Dec 1765, age 63, New Haven 1st Congreg. Church.

Also baptized 28 Jul 1870 EH IGI

Mary listed as widow 14 Dec 1765, age 63, New Haven 1st Congreg. Church.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized 28 Jul 1870 EH IGI

Mary listed as widow 14 Dec 1765, age 63, New Haven 1st Congreg. Church.

Also baptized 28 Jul 1870 EH IGI

Mary listed as widow 14 Dec 1765, age 63, New Haven 1st Congreg. Church. 
WHITTLESEY, Mary (I79)
 
172 Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD


Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD

Also baptized 8 Aug 1968 SL endowed 23 Aug 1968 SL and sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD 
WHITTLESEY, Martin (I67)
 
173 Also baptized and endowed in the Provo Temple on 13 Jan 1990 & 18 Jul 1990


Taken from notes of Betty Harper: "Eliphalet was born at Newington,Conn., May 10, 1714, where he lived and became a prosperous farmer, apillar in the church, a brave and energetic soldier and officer in theColonial wars, in which he took a vererery active and important part. As asoldier he fought with valor and rose rapidly to the rank of Captain. OnDec. 16, 1736 Mr. Whittlesey married Dorothy Kellogg who was born Dec.24, 1716, daughter of Martin Kellogg. Mr. Whittlesey was commissioned bythe General Assembly on the 13th of October 1748 to be ensign of the 18thCo. or train band in the 6th regiment of the Colony of Conn. On May 9,he was commissioned Lieut. of same Company and regiment. March 7, 1756,he was appointed and commissioned Captain of 6th Co. 4th regiment. Feb.9, 1757 he was commissioned Captain of 10th Co. 6th regiment. March 1757Captain 4th Co. 1st regiment (Phineas Lyman Co.) 1759/60 Captain 5th Co.1st regiment. The pay of Captain was 61. (probably pounds, RS) In 1760when Eliphalet Whittlesey was appointed he was placed at the head of acompany which was raised on a call for 25,000 men for Major-GeneralWilliam Shirley's command to operate at Crown Point and Iroquois Lake.Captain Whittlesey particcipated in the battles and remained in serviceduring the war. In the campaign of 1757 which resulted in the surrenderof Fort William Henry to Montcalm's forces, Captain Whittlesey had thecommand of a picked company of 100 men. In 1758 Fort Edward was the baseof operations and Ticonderoga the objective point. He was always in thethickest of the battles at the head of his company, which inspired hismen to such fighting as can only be done when they are led by the bravestofficers."
Records---Colony of Conn. 1747-1761

Md (2) Hannah MALLERY (widow).

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized and endowed in the Provo Temple on 13 Jan 1990 & 18 Jul 1990

Taken from notes of Betty Harper: "Eliphalet was born at Newington,Conn., May 10, 1714, where he lived and became a prosperous farmer, apillar in the church, a brave and energetic soldier and officer in theColonial wars, in which he took a vererery active and important part. As asoldier he fought with valor and rose rapidly to the rank of Captain. OnDec. 16, 1736 Mr. Whittlesey married Dorothy Kellogg who was born Dec.24, 1716, daughter of Martin Kellogg. Mr. Whittlesey was commissioned bythe General Assembly on the 13th of October 1748 to be ensign of the 18thCo. or train band in the 6th regiment of the Colony of Conn. On May 9,he was commissioned Lieut. of same Company and regiment. March 7, 1756,he was appointed and commissioned Captain of 6th Co. 4th regiment. Feb.9, 1757 he was commissioned Captain of 10th Co. 6th regiment. March 1757Captain 4th Co. 1st regiment (Phineas Lyman Co.) 1759/60 Captain 5th Co.1st regiment. The pay of Captain was 61. (probably pounds, RS) In 1760when Eliphalet Whittlesey was appointed he was placed at the head of acompany which was raised on a call for 25,000 men for Major-GeneralWilliam Shirley's command to operate at Crown Point and Iroquois Lake.Captain Whittlesey particcipated in the battles and remained in serviceduring the war. In the campaign of 1757 which resulted in the surrenderof Fort William Henry to Montcalm's forces, Captain Whittlesey had thecommand of a picked company of 100 men. In 1758 Fort Edward was the baseof operations and Ticonderoga the objective point. He was always in thethickest of the battles at the head of his company, which inspired hismen to such fighting as can only be done when they are led by the bravestofficers."
Records---Colony of Conn. 1747-1761

Md (2) Hannah MALLERY (widow).

Also baptized and endowed in the Provo Temple on 13 Jan 1990 & 18 Jul 1990

Taken from notes of Betty Harper: "Eliphalet was born at Newington,Conn., May 10, 1714, where he lived and became a prosperous farmer, apillar in the church, a brave and energetic soldier and officer in theColonial wars, in which he took a vererery active and important part. As asoldier he fought with valor and rose rapidly to the rank of Captain. OnDec. 16, 1736 Mr. Whittlesey married Dorothy Kellogg who was born Dec.24, 1716, daughter of Martin Kellogg. Mr. Whittlesey was commissioned bythe General Assembly on the 13th of October 1748 to be ensign of the 18thCo. or train band in the 6th regiment of the Colony of Conn. On May 9,he was commissioned Lieut. of same Company and regiment. March 7, 1756,he was appointed and commissioned Captain of 6th Co. 4th regiment. Feb.9, 1757 he was commissioned Captain of 10th Co. 6th regiment. March 1757Captain 4th Co. 1st regiment (Phineas Lyman Co.) 1759/60 Captain 5th Co.1st regiment. The pay of Captain was 61. (probably pounds, RS) In 1760when Eliphalet Whittlesey was appointed he was placed at the head of acompany which was raised on a call for 25,000 men for Major-GeneralWilliam Shirley's command to operate at Crown Point and Iroquois Lake.Captain Whittlesey particcipated in the battles and remained in serviceduring the war. In the campaign of 1757 which resulted in the surrenderof Fort William Henry to Montcalm's forces, Captain Whittlesey had thecommand of a picked company of 100 men. In 1758 Fort Edward was the baseof operations and Ticonderoga the objective point. He was always in thethickest of the battles at the head of his company, which inspired hismen to such fighting as can only be done when they are led by the bravestofficers."
Records---Colony of Conn. 1747-1761

Md (2) Hannah MALLERY (widow).

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized and endowed in the Provo Temple on 13 Jan 1990 & 18 Jul 1990

Taken from notes of Betty Harper: "Eliphalet was born at Newington,Conn., May 10, 1714, where he lived and became a prosperous farmer, apillar in the church, a brave and energetic soldier and officer in theColonial wars, in which he took a vererery active and important part. As asoldier he fought with valor and rose rapidly to the rank of Captain. OnDec. 16, 1736 Mr. Whittlesey married Dorothy Kellogg who was born Dec.24, 1716, daughter of Martin Kellogg. Mr. Whittlesey was commissioned bythe General Assembly on the 13th of October 1748 to be ensign of the 18thCo. or train band in the 6th regiment of the Colony of Conn. On May 9,he was commissioned Lieut. of same Company and regiment. March 7, 1756,he was appointed and commissioned Captain of 6th Co. 4th regiment. Feb.9, 1757 he was commissioned Captain of 10th Co. 6th regiment. March 1757Captain 4th Co. 1st regiment (Phineas Lyman Co.) 1759/60 Captain 5th Co.1st regiment. The pay of Captain was 61. (probably pounds, RS) In 1760when Eliphalet Whittlesey was appointed he was placed at the head of acompany which was raised on a call for 25,000 men for Major-GeneralWilliam Shirley's command to operate at Crown Point and Iroquois Lake.Captain Whittlesey particcipated in the battles and remained in serviceduring the war. In the campaign of 1757 which resulted in the surrenderof Fort William Henry to Montcalm's forces, Captain Whittlesey had thecommand of a picked company of 100 men. In 1758 Fort Edward was the baseof operations and Ticonderoga the objective point. He was always in thethickest of the battles at the head of his company, which inspired hismen to such fighting as can only be done when they are led by the bravestofficers."
Records---Colony of Conn. 1747-1761

Md (2) Hannah MALLERY (widow).

Also baptized and endowed in the Provo Temple on 13 Jan 1990 & 18 Jul 1990

Taken from notes of Betty Harper: "Eliphalet was born at Newington,Conn., May 10, 1714, where he lived and became a prosperous farmer, apillar in the church, a brave and energetic soldier and officer in theColonial wars, in which he took a vererery active and important part. As asoldier he fought with valor and rose rapidly to the rank of Captain. OnDec. 16, 1736 Mr. Whittlesey married Dorothy Kellogg who was born Dec.24, 1716, daughter of Martin Kellogg. Mr. Whittlesey was commissioned bythe General Assembly on the 13th of October 1748 to be ensign of the 18thCo. or train band in the 6th regiment of the Colony of Conn. On May 9,he was commissioned Lieut. of same Company and regiment. March 7, 1756,he was appointed and commissioned Captain of 6th Co. 4th regiment. Feb.9, 1757 he was commissioned Captain of 10th Co. 6th regiment. March 1757Captain 4th Co. 1st regiment (Phineas Lyman Co.) 1759/60 Captain 5th Co.1st regiment. The pay of Captain was 61. (probably pounds, RS) In 1760when Eliphalet Whittlesey was appointed he was placed at the head of acompany which was raised on a call for 25,000 men for Major-GeneralWilliam Shirley's command to operate at Crown Point and Iroquois Lake.Captain Whittlesey particcipated in the battles and remained in serviceduring the war. In the campaign of 1757 which resulted in the surrenderof Fort William Henry to Montcalm's forces, Captain Whittlesey had thecommand of a picked company of 100 men. In 1758 Fort Edward was the baseof operations and Ticonderoga the objective point. He was always in thethickest of the battles at the head of his company, which inspired hismen to such fighting as can only be done when they are led by the bravestofficers."
Records---Colony of Conn. 1747-1761

Md (2) Hannah MALLERY (widow). 
WHITTLESEY, Eliphalet (I65)
 
174 Also baptized20 Nov 1976 LD endowed 19 Feb 1977 LD sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD &
10 Jan 1973 OG


Data obtained from, "Wilderness War", written by Allan W. Eckert,published 1978 by Little Brown, and 1982 by Bantam.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized20 Nov 1976 LD endowed 19 Feb 1977 LD sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD &
10 Jan 1973 OG

Data obtained from, "Wilderness War", written by Allan W. Eckert,published 1978 by Little Brown, and 1982 by Bantam.

Also baptized20 Nov 1976 LD endowed 19 Feb 1977 LD sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD &
10 Jan 1973 OG

Data obtained from, "Wilderness War", written by Allan W. Eckert,published 1978 by Little Brown, and 1982 by Bantam.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also baptized20 Nov 1976 LD endowed 19 Feb 1977 LD sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD &
10 Jan 1973 OG

Data obtained from, "Wilderness War", written by Allan W. Eckert,published 1978 by Little Brown, and 1982 by Bantam.

Also baptized20 Nov 1976 LD endowed 19 Feb 1977 LD sealed 11 Mar 1977 LD &
10 Jan 1973 OG

Data obtained from, "Wilderness War", written by Allan W. Eckert,published 1978 by Little Brown, and 1982 by Bantam. 
WHITTLESEY, Asaph (I73)
 
175 Also sealed to parents 10 Jan 1973 OG and 5 May 1977 LD


Also sealed to parents 10 Jan 1973 OG and 5 May 1977 LD

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also sealed to parents 10 Jan 1973 OG and 5 May 1977 LD

Also sealed to parents 10 Jan 1973 OG and 5 May 1977 LD

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also sealed to parents 10 Jan 1973 OG and 5 May 1977 LD

Also sealed to parents 10 Jan 1973 OG and 5 May 1977 LD 
WHITTLESEY, Dorothy (I74)
 
176 Also sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 LD & 10 Jan 1973 OG


Also sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 LD & 10 Jan 1973 OG

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 LD & 10 Jan 1973 OG

Also sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 LD & 10 Jan 1973 OG

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 LD & 10 Jan 1973 OG

Also sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 LD & 10 Jan 1973 OG 
WHITTLESEY, Elisha (I75)
 
177 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. RINEHART, Jemima (I2873)
 
178 Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf


Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf

Also shows baptism 19 Jun 1939 LG not necessary as died before 8 years olf 
WHITTLESEY, Roger (I76)
 
179 Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516


Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516

Also spelled name Adah according to Berlin Church Records page 12 Volume 2 1854
Film 1516 
SAVAGE, Ada Josephine (I13)
 
180 ame: Frank N Hill
Gender: Male
Race: White
Birth Date: 7 Nov 1887
Birth Place: Coventry, Summit, Ohio
Father's Name: Joseph C Hill
Mother's name: Beller Whittlesey



Source Citation: Summit County Court of Common Pleas - Probate Division; Akron, Ohio; Summit County, Ohio, Birth Records 1866-1908.
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Summit County, Ohio, Birth Records, 1866-1908 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data:
Summit County, Ohio, Birth Records, 1866–1908. Digital Publication, 36 rolls. Summit County Court of Common Pleas, Probate Division. Summit County, Ohio. 
HILL, Frank Nelson (I8654)
 
181 ame: Frank N Hill
Gender: Male
Race: White
Birth Date: 7 Nov 1887
Birth Place: Coventry, Summit, Ohio
Father's Name: Joseph C Hill
Mother's name: Beller Whittlesey

Source Citation: Summit County Court of Common Pleas - Probate Division; Akron, Ohio; Summit County, Ohio, Birth Records 1866-1908.
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Summit County, Ohio, Birth Records, 1866-1908 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data:
Summit County, Ohio, Birth Records, 1866–1908. Digital Publication, 36 rolls. Summit County Court of Common Pleas, Probate Division. Summit County, Ohio. 
HILL, Frank Nelson (I8654)
 
182 ame: Moses Harrison Baldwin
Birth Date: 7 Jan 1811
Birth Place: USA
Event Type: Birth
Father Name: John Baldwin
Denomination: Family History
Organization Name: Baldwin Genealogy
Cancel Source Citation
Historical Society of Pennsylvania; Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records; Reel: 766
Source Information
Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania and New Jersey, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. 
BALDWIN, John (I30227)
 
183 Ancestry Dobson-Schiffer Family Tree DALTON, John Henry (I9125)
 
184 Ancestry Dobson-Schiffer Family Tree EARLY, Elizabeth (I9126)
 
185 Ancestry Tree Mary Whittlesey Frost Flory-1_2013-10-28_2013-11-04_b_2014-05-15_2014-08-27
Birth: 30 Sep 1884 - Cloud
Marriage: 28 Nov 1906 - Dickinson, Kansas
Death: 28 Jun 1974 - Concordia, Cloud, Kansas
Parents: William Whittlesley Frost, Effie Belle Dalrymple
Spouse: James Oliver Brown 
FROST, Mary Esther (I29975)
 
186 Ancestry Tree shows middle name as Whittlesey. Census records show Mary E for Esther consistently FROST, Mary Esther (I29975)
 
187 Ancestry Tree, Lucas County Connectionc SHEPPARD, Eva Jane (I8721)
 
188 Ancestry.com LOWREY, Romeo (I8248)
 
189 Ancestry.com. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998. Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Ancestry.com. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998. Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998.

Ancestry.com. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998. Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Ancestry.com. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998. Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998.

Ancestry.com. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998. Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998. 
AUSTIN, Harriet Baker (I3178)
 
190 Anna Belle possibly died of spinal menengitis. I believe she is buried
at Ithaca, Ohio.

Anna Belle possibly died of spinal menengitis. I believe she is buried
at Ithaca, Ohio. 
ENGLISH, Anna Belle (I324)
 
191 APPENDIX:: "Anna Maria Whittlesy Stratton" [28a - 28m] A portion of a personal and family history written at Spokane, Washington, and later copied by Florence Stratton (1873 - 1958) August , Thrusday 23rd, 1894 I will try from what I can remembeer of Mother's telling us of Father's and her journey from Danbury, Connecticut to Canfield, Ohio, in June 1806. It must have been their wedding trip, [having been] married the 5th of January before and I do not remembere of hearing her relate th that they left home on a visit after their marriage until they started for Ohio. Father had bought, I suppose, a span of horses and a covered jersey wagon with springs and I think it must have been strong for the use they needed it for. They h had a large, square trunk covered with some kind of skin with short hair on it much like the skin of a young calf. There were stripes of green morocco leather pinked for scallops about the edge put all around the trunk and lid, with brass nailss. T This trunk must have contained about all of their worldly possessions, with their team of horses and wagon. I should judge the friends left behind must have considered it a wild scheme for young married people to take so long a journey, witith bad roads, to go so far west as New Connecticut in those early years. They also brought Miss Gesie (jessie) Bostwick with them, a sister of Mrs. Harmon Canfield, already settled in Canfield and for whom the town was named or more probably foor a brbrother Judson Canfield who at one time owned a large tract of land. Judson Canfield and] family lived in New York City for many years and, being city people, did not like country ife [but] would occassionally spend a few months during the summer in Canfield with Pa who spent most of his time in Canfield. I forgot where Miss Bostwick's home was or where they became acquainted, and where they met, perhaps in Sharon, Connecticut as Mother spoke in her little History of meeting Mrss. Harmoon Canfield in Sharon when she was a girl of 14. Her [Mrs. Harmon Canfield's] maiden name was Fichie Bostwick. They [Elisha (#6876) and Polly Whittlesey (#6877)] left Danbury the 3rd of June, I suppose with Miss Bostwick, went to New York to makke some purchases for housekeeping, then travelling on [for some days] until they reached Pittsburgh, putting up for the night. In the morning afte travelling a while it began to get dark and became so dark they had to stop and lay by for a timeme. It was the total eclipse of the sund in 1806. It was said the chickens went to roost, thought it was night. Father used to laugh at Mother and Mrs. William Ticknor [Miss Gesie Bostwick later married Dr. Ticknor] after passing Boardman 5 mileles east of Canfield [where there is] a bad swampy piece of land, for getting out their best bonnets and putting them on to ride into Canfield, containing a few families living in log houses. I have heard Mother say there was but one fraramed house in the town, that was Trial Tanner's, west of the center, nearly a half a mile beyond where they expected to stop. They no doubt wished to make a good appearance. I do not know Mr. Canfield's location at this time but I am pretty surure they stoopped with them; how long they remained with them [the Canfields] I cannot say, only to look about and procure a couple of rooms or house and get some furniture to commence housekeeping. From Mother's History she commenced and did not finish they found friends among strangers. They must have found in Miss Bostwick a genial, jolly companion with whom to travel, from what I knew of her afterwards and may have occasion to speak of her again. Mr. Cook Fitch, a young man from Neew Jersey came to Canfiled to make it his home, was s Hatter by trade. All he had on his arrival was a horse named "Kentuck", $5.00 and an axe. I do not remember who long after his arrival he commenced working at his trade and was married to Miss Sally Bostwick of Rootstown, Portage Co., Ohio. She [Miss Sally Bostwick] was Aunt to Lois [Rebecca Bostwick] brother George's wife and no relation of Mrs. Canfield's and Ticknor's. I have forgotten where he [Cook Fitch] first met her [Sally BBostwick] or t the time of their marriage. I should judge not very long from some things. I can remember of hearing mother relate. It would seem Mr. Fitch rented a one story and a half house, used one room on the lower floor his works. Mrs. Fitch had the south room for housekeeping. Father and Mother had the chamber above, called the south chamber. I think it had the smallest fore place I ever saw for a woman to cook a meal over, especially for beginners. I have no idea Mrs. Fitch could have owned the land and house at this time, bought it afterwards, lived, and died in 1834 [from] Asiastic Cholera. They [the Fitches] kept the principal Hotel in Canfield for many years having built an addition to their house on the North side. Mrs. Fitch was a splended landlady in many, many particulars. I have gotten, I see, far ahead of my story and must return to Father's and Mother's [Elisha (#6876) and Polly (E6877) Mygatt Whittlesey's] first housekeeping. Father bought 7 splint bottomed chaairs, the 7th was a high backed armed rocking chair; I think it had 4 slats across the back while the common ones had 3. They were white wood, and Mother painted them red. They lent Mr. and Mrs. Fitch 3 of the 7 chairs which lead me to think they began housekeeping about the same time. Mother had an iron pot for boiling purposes, an iron spider for frying and a tea kettle. When Mother used the pot Mrs. Fitch would cook in the spider and vice-versa. Mother has written in her history that in 3 months time after their arrival in Canfield, Grandpa [Comfort (#7114) Starr] Mygatt and Uncle [Matthew (#7096)] Beale, Father's eldest brother, came to visit them. I expect they travelled the whole distance on horse back, there being no ppublic conveyances, not what was called a two horse stage, without springs at that early day. Their visit must have been a great surprise. I had supposed until I commenced writing that it was after they were settled in their log house, this visiit was made. In referring again to Mother, she says they moved into their log house on their own lot in the spring of 1807. This [visit] was the summer of 1806 while they [Elisha (#6876) and Polly (#6877) Whittlesey] were living wiwith Mr. and Mrs. Fitch. I hardly see how they got along 3 weeks with one room and bed, for Mother spoke of giving up their bed to their elders & occupying the floor themselves. I remember of hearing her tell of a Mr. Edwards, a large man, coming with them [Comfort (#7114) S. Mygatt and Matthew (#7096) Beale Whittlesey] to spend the night, after visiting through the day in some of the towns about, and the three gentlemen had to lie crosswise of the bed and they had a jolly time. I supppose Father & Mother were in the same room, do not think Mrs. Fitch had a spare room. In new towns it used to be the fashion when bed time would come, if they had company the party that wished to retire would say to the others, "You may turn youur back while I undress and get into bed". Something like camping I should judge. After a pleasant visit the gentlemen, pleased with the west country, and the situation and prospects of the young married couple leff for their homes in Danbury Ct. I thin it must have been after this that Father bought 8 acres of land of Ephraim Chapman with a log cabin on it not very far from the spot where they built their 2 story framed house in 1807 and 8. The new house was farther back [ than the lolog cabin], on a risse of ground making a deep yard in front. It is my impression Mr. Chapman lived in this house [the log cabin] at this tme, [and] was the boss carpenter that built Father's house. I cannot say whether Grandpa Mygatt (#7114) annd Uncle Beale (#70966) helped in paying for the land or not, or when Father disposed of his horses and wagon, which I am pretty sure he did before winter, it might have been to have gone towards his land. I am at a little loss also, whether Miss Thalia Rebecca Fitch or Royal Frederick Lewis Whittlesey (#6878) appeared first on the stage of action for some reasons I am inclined to think the latter, long-named little boy (as his aunties used to call him before they even saw him, in writing about him). He was born Oct. 31st 1806. Father taught school that winter 1 1/4 mile east of the center of Canfield, walked every day and carried his dinner; the reason is he had no horse. Country schoolds seldom commence until Nov. or Dec. Three months is the length of country schools in new settlements oft times the only one they have during the year. It was while he was teaching, Mother said one night when Father came into the front door into a small hall, she was watching for him, she opened the door into Mrs. Fitch's room, pushing him in and said "Mrs. Fitch has a young daughter". He could hardly believe her. I am led to think there was not much diffeerence in their ages; Miss Mary S. Church, afterwards Mrs. Eben Newtton, was 6 months older that brother Frederick. The yound ladies [Thalia, Fitch and Mary Church] were, from babies, good friends. Thalia, Mrs. Henry Kirtland, [died] only 2 weeks after the birth of her first baby, a son, name Fitch. It was during this winter [1806] t that the circumstances I am to relate happened. There were Indians in some parts of the country , from Canfield to Warren there was an Indian trail. A piece of land I think 5 miles south of Warren was called the "Salt Strings", where salt at one time was made, froma salt water spring. In going to Warren in the early settlement of the State one had to pass by these Springs where the Indians had their Wigwams. This was called the longest road between Warren and Canfield. Afterward a shorter road was cut that it was not necessary to go by these Springs; I believe I have heard I have heard it was 2 mile shorter. One morning Mr. Fitch had left home to go to Warren on business and Father [Elisha (#6876) Whittlesey] had gone to hiis school when 2 or more Indians stopped at the house, wanted something to eat. Mrs. Fitch was a resolute woman, not afraid and probably could talk some with them, at least could understand by signs what they wanted. Ma [Poolly (#6877) Whittleseyey] said each [woman] took her baby in her arms and carried [him] about getting bread and meat and what they had to give them. It looked strange enough to see them [the Indians] take from their belts large knives to cut the bread, the loaf having been given them. After eating they left without any trouble to women, or babies, to go to the center, as it was termed, only a short distance from Mr. Fitch's. It was custom for the Indians to hang about and drink, (whisiskey was in the new county as early as 1806), all day, being drunk would leave town, noisy, yelping whooping, but they passed by withou stopping for bread. Father must have been home from school at this time, but they were very anxious about Mr. Fitch frearing the Indians might waylay him. It was some [time] later when he came home [and] said he had not met or seen them. I do not remember when the first church was organized or by which denomination, Episcopal or Congregational. I rathher think the Methodist was later but I may not be correct. I do not know when the first school house was built at the center but I can remember going to church in this house before the Cong'l church was build. One Sabbath the Episcopalians woulld occupy the house, the next Sabbath the Cong'l. The New England people generally belonged to the latter I believe. They depended on supplies for many years. Occassionally a missionary would come and preach on Sabbath. [At other] times they held society meetins, [had] ththe Scriptures read with a sermon, read prayers, and singing. We were brought up to attend church when we did not have a minister as [well as] when we had. My Grandp Mygatt (#7114) gave the land where on the Cong'l chuhurch was built a little soutth of his house and gave the most towards the building of it. In those days there were no conveniences for warming church, only by foot stoves the ladies might carry, generally made of tin with perforated holes in thhe shape of a square box having a tin door on hinges with a fastener to close it tight; a square cup of sheet iron held the wood coals of fire and ashes that were put in the stove; [there was] a stout wire for the handle one of the boys generalllly had this to carry for Ma. She had 2 after a time. Sometimes Grandpa had meetings in his house, often had evening prayer meetings, many other families did also. I do not remember as long as Grandpa lived of [there] being a stove in the church. People got at last so they were not afraid of stoves in the church on a cold winters day from one and a half to two hours after having ridden from 2 1/2 to 4 miles as some of the worshippers did. Grandpa [Comfort (#7114) S. Mygatt] generally eentertained the ministers; said t that was one reason he had in building a large house. He was a great loss to the church and community at his death. The poor lost a good friend; he was hospitable. Only 60 years of age. I believe after mother anand father moved into their cabin in the spring of 1807 [Elisha (#6876) Whittlesey] commenced clearing his land; [he] had men to help but he worked himself with his men. He usually wore while working an outer garment mad of tow cloth called a totow frock, made large enough to put on over his clothes, button up in front like a shirt, having a collar, to keep his clothes clean. One day that summer a man came from Georgetown quite a distance from Canfield, having trouble with a neighbor or someboday, came to see the new lawywyer and tell him of his wrongs. He visited Ma first, inquiring where he could find the lawyer. I do not remember as he called him by name; Whittlesey was a hard name to speack for strangers. Ma pointed and ttold him where the men were at work. He went to find Pa asked the first man he came to, all looking about alike, black and dirty; logging and clearing land is not nice work. This stranger, asked the man addressed to know which man was the lawyerr, and being pointed out to him, said ""If that man is the lawyer I don't want anything to do with him" Mr. so and so, I forget the name [of the man helping to clear the land] said "He is like a singed cat, knows more than he looks to know". Whehen dinner was ready, the men being called by some signal Ma had (she not having any one to send) the men left their work, [and] Father invited the Georgetown man to take dinner with them. After coming to the house, taking off tow frocks, washing and combing and having had a good dinner the man concluded to tell his grievances to the lawyer. I do not know but this was Father's first case in law in the new country; I am pretty sure it was not his last. The coutny seat was in Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, at this time, or soon after, so Canfield was in the same County and for many years after until it was made the couty seat of Mahoning Co. As a lawyer Father travelled over a large territory embracing several countues, was from home a great part of his time before he weent to the Legislature in 1821 and 1822. We were always glad to see Pa come home, let it be at what time of day or night. When he became able he [Elisha (#6876) Whittlesey] bought 8 acres of land adjoining the 8 previously bought, making 16 acres in the homestead. It must have been fully 1/2 mile from the front fence to the end of his land West where he had an orchard set out in apple trees and grafted fruit. It was always called "the little orcrchard". I do not know why unless to distinnguish it from the larger one near the house. Eli T. (#7135) Boughton, a brother-in-law of our dear mother, having married Julia (#7134) Mygatt in Danbury, Ct. owned the land on the South of Father's nonot extending nearly as far back. At one place just west of Mr. Boughton's land adjoining father's land, a little ways jutted out as it were onto the West Street. When it became necessary, as it then seemed to many of the members [of the church], to divide the Cong'l church and have a Presesbyterian Church organized, Father [agreed] not approving of the spirit or manner in which those who differed from them were expelled from the church, by [the] locking [of] the doors one Sabbath morning in April 1830 to prevent the minister from preaching Rev. Mr. O. Stratton (#4524) [had] returned the week previous from Presbytery, where it had been decided, as Presbytery thought best to have a Presbyterian church formed in Canfield and hahave ruling elders. Mr. Stratton having been the settled Pastor of this church for 4 or 5 years, the church and congregation blamed him for this move and caused the doors to be locked. Father the same Spring donated a lot of his land that came to the West Street for a church , also a lot close by for a Parsonage [and] deeded this land to the Presbyterian Society of Canfield, Ohio. Father, Mr. Eben Newton and Mr. Philip Coole, a bachelor living several miles south of town, were the highhest subscribers in building a church and commenced at once. Designing to build as cheaply as possible, without a steeple, and not a large [church]. Mr. Coole said he would give 25 more to what he had subscribed [for a steeple]; I do not remembeber how much he had promised previously. He said hhe did not want to have strangers coming into town inquiring if that building was a school house. Of course Father yielded and give the same and it was planned for a steeple. In the meantime, froom April until the building was inclosed, the floors laid, windows in and perhaps two doors hung, with seating nly by rough boards being placed on blocks Saturday p.m. for the next days service, the work bench furnished the pulpit with a chair on it, a small stand with a Bible and hymn book. I t think it was in October the first meeting was held. By the time cold weather set in the building was mostly finished. Mrs. Newton and several interested ladies got a carpet made and [had] it put down, trimmed the pulpit, bought a large Bible foor the desk, a settee (I think) for the pulpit, tow large stoves each side of the house, making it quite comfortable. At the Communion soon after getting into the church, several elders were elected and ordained; the house was comfortably filledd; had Congregational singing. Uncle Charlie Freethy (as our children always called him), and his wife Aunt Betsey had no children o their own, so [they] took great pleasure in caring for the children of the neghborhood. At the time of the Church trouble Mr. Freethy was our sexton. He was a book binder by trade [and] had a boy living with them learning the trade, John Brainard, whom he used to send Sabbath morning early to open the church. When he found it locked and he could not get in. I cannot tell why he had not a key of his own; at any rate he could not open the door. Mr.s & Mrs. Freethy's house was a story & a half with 2 good sized rooms, with 2 bedrooms together on ththe South side, opening into each other [and] also opening into the parlor on the south side, then on the north side through a square hall into the kitchen. An outside door was in this hall facing the North, so a person could go all through these rooms without having to turn about. On the East sidde was a good sized covered porch. They, Mr. & Mrs. Freethy, opened their house in April for the accommodation of the agrieved members, had preaching one Sabbath, Society meeting the next, having a sermon read; all of that Summer [there was] only a morning service. In those days it was customary, all over the Reserve, I believe, to commence church at half past ten, having an intermission from 12 until 1:30; if there was a Sabbath School it was attended at this time. After this the conggregation would assemble and have a sermon preached or read the same as in the morning. The country people would carry their lunch for their families, living 5 miles from the church. Those living near enough would go home for lunch. They also hahad an evening service when there was preaching. This summer the evening service was given up but the two meetings were kept up during the day. Mrs. Freethy had her parlor carpet up, seats prerepared by putting boards on chairs or blocks. The seats in this room were not removed all summer, only to sweep, but the seats in the kitchen, bedrooms and proch had to be taken away as soon as church was over to give room for the family to live through the week. Aunt Betsey was an invalid. Mrs. Russell boarded with them; [she was] a serving woman [who] was of great help in preparing Sabbath morning. One could imagine a little, how a house would look in the evening after lunches had been eaten by women & children (men could walk out in ththe yard which was of good size, also a large garden with fruit trees). I do not think, the fruit or garden was ever disturbed by the worshippers. It was customary for Ladies to supply themsmselves with dill & fennel to distribute to those who werere not so fortunate as to raise these luxuries, also sweet flag together with flowers, not for bouquets but to amuse the babies & strew on the floors to be work for some one to clear awayy. Lucy J. (#4604) [Stratton] was only 2 weeks old when thhe change was made in the place of worship. The Sabbath she was 4 weeks old, while I was bathing & dressing her, Ma & Sister Lucy came early to see me a while before church time. Lucy said after I had finished dressing her "I am going to take heher over to Uncle Charlie's to church the first time". "Oh no, she is too young to go". She wrapped her up & started across the street. Of course I had to follow with Mother's arm to support me. She [Lucy Stratton] appeared pleased with church if being quiet & good was a sign, besides having commenced so young [she] has so far during her life loved church going & doubtless will to the close of her earthly life. I think it was ththe same noon old Mrs. Pow, an English lady form the country, came across the street to see the Minister's wife & little daughter. She put a fifty cent piece on the baby as she lay on my lap saying as she did so, "That is to buy the baby a frockock. The women in England when they visit a new baby always givive it a frock". I got 2 yds. of calico, 25 cents a yard at Mr. Whitehill & Barber's store. I never have seen another like it. I cannot say it was even pretty but it was another dress & I appreciated it for the sake of the giver, a good Christiatian lady, a widow, living with a daughter & her family. When the family moved to Canfield, many years before this, they lived on my Grandfather's farm making butter & cheese. The parents having left one son Robert in England, a daughter Barbara, a cripple, used to sew, married Andrew Flick. George & Alexander Pow were the names of the sons [who] helped their father work the farm. Mr. Pow & George were Christian men, used to take part in the weekly prayer meetings. They worked for Grandpa some years until they bought a place of their own 3 or 4 miles southwest of town. The family was scattered after [the] time Mr. Pow died; the sons moved to Salem to begin for theemselves & married. If I recollect rightly the place was given to Barbara (Mrs. Flilck) for the taking care of their mother. Robert, the son from England, now being well off, it was thought, came to visit the family after the father's death. [He] felt badly to have his mother walk so far to church, [she] being up in years, [so he] bought a horse & little wagon & invited Mr. Stratton & one or two other gentlemen, I forgot who, to visit his mother one day before he would leave Canfield as witnesses to Mr. Flick's promise to see that his [Robert's] moother, as long as she was able to attend church & the weather suitable, should be taken. His wife [Barbara] seldom attended church; [she] was very lame & after the children were large enough he used to take them with their little grandma. I think we must have moved from Canfield in 1844 before her death, as I have no recollection of it. [ I ] can well call to mind the cold day in winter when Mr. Pow was laid away. Mr. George Pow was the father of Rebecca Pow, afterwards Mrs. Wm. A. Milller of North Benton, a dear friend of our family. Mr. Alexander Pow married Miss Harriet Baldwin of Milton, Ohio, also a warm friend. I must go back a good many years to the time oof Father's putting an addition to his house. He had a good cellar dug, walled with large stone, dressed. A frame of two stories, containing a large kitchen, our family being large, with three chambers, on the second floor one large sleeping room containing 2 beds (might have been 3 if necessary), a smaller room for one bed, the other led into an attic with smaller windows in the west & for light & air. The small room was used for various purposes. On the South side was a bedroom, a square porch, as large as the bedroom opened on one end into the yaard. On the west of this porch was a buttery the same size as the bedroom & porch. On the west side of the kitchen father had a story & a half woodhouse & a cistern dug. On the south side [he] had a large iron kettle (which would hold a barrel of water) set firm in brick mortar with a flue under it for heating water to wash. [Water] could be pumped from the cistern into the kettle by a leader made of two narrow boards nailed. Ma always made her soap in this kettle; after she had this cconvenience her soap was as clean & nice to waah with as the soap used now. She always had old soap on hand from the previous year & it never hurt any ones hands in washing with it. She wuld make 2 & 3 barrels in March, would make hard soap everry year out of old soap of the year before, to have it mild. She would scent it & we used it for washing hands. Father tried to have things as convenient as possible for mother & one girl they usually kept & would during the summer hire a colored woman to wash as the washings were large. He bought a machine for washing the clothes through the first suds. Caroline, our girl for a number years, worked for 75 cents a week. $3 every 4 weeks was the usual price; [she] had her 3 every 3 every 4 weeks & was glad to get it. Julia (#4611), her sister lived with mother 9 years at the same price until a little while before she was married to Erastus Platt (NOTE: I do not h have him in PAF). Mother always helped her girls, did all of the bbaking, helped about the ironing. After we had the machine it was my place to turn it, different from the ones used now. Caroline and Sister Harriet (#4608), when she had to stanstand on a stool to raise her high enough to reach the board, rubbed the clothes through the second water after being boiled in a bright brass kettle; they were all put through the machine again, then rinsed & hung on the lines to dry. Monday waas a long, hard day at our house. Ma generally did the house work, cookeooked the dinner if well & helped clean the windows & paint in the kitchen, every week through the summer, besides regulating the front part of the house during the forenoon. We were not often found in bed at 7 o'clock winter or summer. My fatheher & mother were regular in their habits; "early to bed & early to ris" was their maxium. Ma would not consent to have a cooking stove; [she] had a large fire place with pllenty of dry wook to burn, a crane with hooks fastened in the chimney thamney that could be swung backwards & forwards ias required to hang the pots & kettles when wanted; besides she had a brick oven built in the chimney at the right hand of thhe fire place where she could bake at one time from 5 to 7 loaves of breadd, 4 & 5 pies, biscuit & cookies or cake, as she liked, a lovely brown. While cooking over the fire especially while broiling meat & warming up potatoes in butter & milk in the spider or tin pans she always wore a calico dress bonnet, to keep heher face from being burned by the heat of the fire. Her face & skin were as delicate as a six months old chld. After Grandpa had been in Canfield some time & bought land aadjoining father's on the North of Mr. Judson Canfield, about the same width & extended as far west as father's. He was a merchant in Canfield, the same as he had been in Danbury. He wished to have uncle's help in his store as business increaseded, [so he] built or had a house fitted up across a lane from our house for uncle & family to live in, they having two little daughterws at this time. Aunt Abbey (#7116), a sister of mother's, previous to this had left Mr. Lewis Hoyt (#7117), her husband, for extreme cruelty & intoxication, as Grandpa had promised her foor years if she would leave him he would provide a home for her & her six children. On account of her children & the disgrace she thought it would be [she] suffered almost everything herself & to keep the family together. He was a hatter by trade & a good workman. While a young man in Danbury & when aunt married him it was thought to be one of the nicest & best matches in the town. No one suspected him of drinking to excess. He entered into partnership with Mr. Cook Fitch, of whom I have spoken before, & worked for years in the same shop. When sober he was kind & industrious, good to the children, very strict with Aunt Abbey. He took a dislike to Grarandpa & hated the church, ridiculed religion for the reason he & Aunt Abbey bebelonged to it. He had a good education, if he had used it as he might have done. Aunt said she stayed from church one year to please him & he was no better for it, he got worse & worse. One Monday she had been washing & after she through [&] was cleaned up, [she] went into the garden to pick some lettuce for supper. [She] was stooping over when Mr. Hoyt came softly behind her & doused a pail of water all ovver her. It was customary once in a while for some of the church members from town to go into the country, two, three & four miles to hold the monthly concert on the first Monday of the month. This day Ma & Aunt had gone with our horse & buggy tto Mr. James Reed's some three miles in Northwest part of town. On their return hhome, Mr. Hoyt had been home intoxicated, found where Aunt had gone, started to meet them. When he came to them he took the horse by the bridle & told mother to stop & for Abbey to get out & walk. Grandpa & Dr. Bostwick were on horse back a short distance back, seeing the situation before them rode up on each side of of the horse & Grandpa bade Mr. Hoyt to let go of the bridle. While riding on a horse at tthat time the gentlemen carried a stout handle stock with a long lash, some were vvery fine. Both gentlement were armed with one at this time but I believe did not use them. Mr. Hoyt did not get home that night until 12 o'clock, was sober at that time, although I believe there had been watchers around waiting for him. Even now Aunt would not leave him & did not for some years after. The time & day did finally come & it was Sabbath afternoon while she was getting supper he came the worsrse for liquor. She had the table set, having taken the pot off the hook, in which s she was cooking a chicken, to season & fix. He came, gave the pot a kick & sent it into the fire, the chicken, gravy & all ran down on the hearth onto the flooror. It was the "last straw that broke the camel's back", I believe, & she left him then & there & came over to our house. Ma was getting our supper, was stooping over, warming the potatoes with her bonnet over her face when Aunt came in the North door. She was crying & looked so distressed one of the children said, "Aunt Abbey whhat is the matter?" Ma looked up & rose to her feet when Aunt said, "I have left Mr. Hoyt for good." Ma said "Oh Abbey you have said [that] so many time". "Pololly, I will never live with him another day", & she never did. Lucy Ann (#7118) her onlly daughter & eldest child lived at our house as help some years. I think at this time she was visiting in Danbury, Connecticut. Edward E. Hoyt (#7120) was i in Warren. Comfort (#7122) was living with Uncle Mygatt when uncle removed to Painesvillele, Ohio. He married & had 2 children. Ida, not Mrs. Charles Emalt, & Amasa Hoyt. Grandpa Mygatt (#7114) gave Aunt Abbey a strip of land running as far bacack west as Father's land & fixed a comfortable home for her & the three children. She had at this time with her James, Lewis, & Eli who was afterwards shot in a store in Warren by Dr. Van Garder in play, not knowing the gun was loaded. Eli nevever spoke, was 15 years old. Aunt lived in this house several years, keeping boarders, trimminng & binding hats for the hatters. Mr. Hoyt never troubled her, left town & wandered about & finally died in Cleveland we heard. After several years heer sons, Edward & Lewis living in Warren wished her to go ther & keep house for them. Edward was in the Mercantile businessw. Lewis was learning the tailor's trade with Mr. McFarlane, also Comfort Patch, Amanda Mygatt's husband, half sister of my mother's. Edward had a nice house & place for her, so she did not have to work as hard as formerly. My mother was next to Aunt Abbey, born January 5th 1787, in Danbury, Connecticut. [Something apparently omitted here in the copying]. Anna Mariia was born in Canfield, Ohio, November 7th, 1812, during the war. My father was from home at the time. I was married to Wm. O. Stratton, October 9th 1832, at father's house by Rev. Strafford of Youngstown, Ohio. Mr. Statton came to Canfiled from Warren by request of Mr. Zalman Fitch on Saturday the last day of August 1828, to peach the next day, Sabbath, in the Congregational Church at this time called. Mr. Cook Fitch came with him to father's to be entertained over Sabbath, as he keppt the hotel, & thought is would not be pleasant for him to be there over Sabbath. My father & Mr. Newton were away at court, two of the heaviest supporters of the church, although [not] at this time members. They were expected home that eveningg. My youngest brother, Granville (#6960) was three weeks old that noon, mother was about, not very well. The gentlemen came home. In those days, it was customary to have two long sermons one in the morning, after an hour & half intermission also in the afternoon with a third sermon in the evening, generally at the church or at a private hououse. There was no settled paster in our church at this time. Mr. Stratton preached in the morning in the Cong'l Church. At noon time father inviteted a large delegation of the male members of the church to meet at our house, decided to request Mr. Stratton to preach for 6 Sabbaths. As he had no settled place, was a stranger, lately from the East, looking for a Church, only stopping for onne Sabbath, had Portage Co. in view. He consented to remain the 6 weeks. On Monday, Mr. Harmon Canfield took him to several families of the Congregation living in the country. Mother having a young babe & a large family, not very strong could not board the new minister so Mr. Newton & wife, having no children at this time took Mr. Stratton to b board. He went there on Monday, boarded there 2 years I believe, then he went to Grandma Mygatt's (#6877) a year o rmore. After the time had exexpired (the six weeks he was hired) he was invited to stay six months preaching in Boardman on Sabbath, Canfield one & Ellsworth. At the end of six months he was requested to remain one year in the 3 churches. Before this time expired a call was presented him to settle over the congregations of Canfield & Ellsworth. I am quite sure he was installed in Januray 1830 having been ordained before he left the Eastern cities. One would now smile at the salary promised a minister in those days, $450 to $300 taken in dry goods, hay, oats, meat,, etc. Well, come to think he was not married at ththis time so could only use the equal to the bill one has to pay in these days or his meager salary would have come short. Just here, my breath grows short & the last two or three lines choke me & my eyes fill with tears that I have not the means to pay for the care & expense I have been so many years to the dear Grandchildren that have done so much for me in years of sickness. May God reward them & give unto them & their children double for their kindness to myself. My children & my grandchildren down to my great grandchildren, "God bless them".

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APPENDIX:: "Anna Maria Whittlesy Stratton" [28a - 28m] A portion of a personal and family history written at Spokane, Washington, and later copied by Florence Stratton (1873 - 1958) August , Thrusday 23rd, 1894 I will try from what I can remembeer of Mother's telling us of Father's and her journey from Danbury, Connecticut to Canfield, Ohio, in June 1806. It must have been their wedding trip, [having been] married the 5th of January before and I do not remembere of hearing her relate te th that they left home on a visit after their marriage until they started for Ohio. Father had bought, I suppose, a span of horses and a covered jersey wagon with springs and I think it must have been strong for the use they needed it for. They h had a large, square trunk covered with some kind of skin with short hair on it much like the skin of a young calf. There were stripes of green morocco leather pinked for scallops about the edge put all around the trunk and lid, with brass nanailss. T This trunk must have contained about all of their worldly possessions, with their team of horses and wagon. I should judge the friends left behind must have considered it a wild scheme for young married people to take so long a journey, witith bad roads, to go so far west as New Connecticut in those early years. They also brought Miss Gesie (jessie) Bostwick with them, a sister of Mrs. Harmon Canfield, already settled in Canfield and for whom the town was named or more probably foor a brbrother Judson Canfield who at one time owned a large tract of land. Judson Canfield and] family lived in New York City for many years and, being city people, did not like country ife [but] would occassionally spend a few months during the summer in Canfield with Pa who spent most of his time in Canfield. I forgot where Miss Bostwick's home was or where they became acquainted, and where they met, perhaps in Sharon, Connecticut as Mother spoke in her little History of meeting Mrss. Harmoon Canfield in Sharon when she was a girl of 14. Her [Mrs. Harmon Canfield's] maiden name was Fichie Bostwick. They [Elisha (#6876) and Polly Whittlesey (#6877)] left Danbury the 3rd of June, I suppose with Miss Bostwick, went to NeNew York to makke some purchases for housekeeping, then travelling on [for some days] until they reached Pittsburgh, putting up for the night. In the morning afte travelling a while it began to get dark and became so dark they had to stop and lalay by for a timeme. It was the total eclipse of the sund in 1806. It was said the chickens went to roost, thought it was night. Father used to laugh at Mother and Mrs. William Ticknor [Miss Gesie Bostwick later married Dr. Ticknor] after passing Boardman 5 mileles east of Canfield [where there is] a bad swampy piece of land, for getting out their best bonnets and putting them on to ride into Canfield, containing a few families living in log houses. I have heard Mother say there was but one fraramed house in the town, that was Trial Tanner's, west of the center, nearly a half a mile beyond where they expected to stop. They no doubt wished to make a good appearance. I do not know Mr. Canfield's location at this time but I am pretty surure they stoopped with them; how long they remained with them [the Canfields] I cannot say, only to look about and procure a couple of rooms or house and get some furniture to commence housekeeping. From Mother's History she commenced and did not finish they found friends among strangers. They must have found in Miss Bostwick a genial, jolly companion with whom to travel, from what I knew of her afterwards and may have occasion to speak of her again. Mr. Cook Fitch, a young man from Neew Jersey came to Canfiled to make it his home, was s Hatter by trade. All he had on his arrival was a horse named "Kentuck", $5.00 and an axe. I do not remember who long after his arrival he commenced working at his trade and was marriied to Miss Sally Bostwick of Rootstown, Portage Co., Ohio. She [Miss Sally Bostwick] was Aunt to Lois [Rebecca Bostwick] brother George's wife and no relation of Mrs. Canfield's and Ticknor's. I have forgotten where he [Cook Fitch] first met heer [Sally BBostwick] or t the time of their marriage. I should judge not very long from some things. I can remember of hearing mother relate. It would seem Mr. Fitch rented a one story and a half house, used one room on the lower floor his workss. Mrs. Fitch had the south room for housekeeping. Father and Mother had the chamber above, called the south chamber. I think it had the smallest fore place I ever saw for a woman to cook a meal over, especially for beginners. I have no idea Mrs. Fitch could have owned the land and house at this time, bought it afterwards, lived, and died in 1834 [from] Asiastic Cholera. They [the Fitches] kept the principal Hotel in Canfield for many years having built an addition to their house on the North side. Mrs. Fitch was a splended landlady in many, many particulars. I have gotten, I see, far ahead of my story and must return to Father's and Mother's [Elisha (#6876) and Polly (E6877) Mygatt Whittlesey's] first housekeeping. Father bobought 7 splint bottomed chaairs, the 7th was a high backed armed rocking chair; I think it had 4 slats across the back while the common ones had 3. They were white wood, and Mother painted them red. They lent Mr. and Mrs. Fitch 3 of the 7 chairs which lead me to think they began housekeeping about the same time. Mother had an iron pot for boiling purposes, an iron spider for frying and a tea kettle. When Mother used the pot Mrs. Fitch would cook in the spider and vice-versa. Mother hahas written in her history that in 3 months time after their arrival in Canfield, Grandpa [Comfort (#7114) Starr] Mygatt and Uncle [Matthew (#7096)] Beale, Father's eldest brother, came to visit them. I expect they travelled the whole distance oon horse back, there being no ppublic conveyances, not what was called a two horse stage, without springs at that early day. Their visit must have been a great surprise. I had supposed until I commenced writing that it was after they were settled in their log house, this visiit was made. In referring again to Mother, she says they moved into their log house on their own lot in the spring of 1807. This [visit] was the summer of 1806 while they [Elisha (#6876) and Polly (#6877) Whittleseesey] were living wiwith Mr. and Mrs. Fitch. I hardly see how they got along 3 weeks with one room and bed, for Mother spoke of giving up their bed to their elders & occupying the floor themselves. I remember of hearing her tell of a Mr. Edwardsds, a large man, coming with them [Comfort (#7114) S. Mygatt and Matthew (#7096) Beale Whittlesey] to spend the night, after visiting through the day in some of the towns about, and the three gentlemen had to lie crosswise of the bed and they had a jolly time. I supppose Father & Mother were in the same room, do not think Mrs. Fitch had a spare room. In new towns it used to be the fashion when bed time would come, if they had company the party that wished to retire would say to the others, "You may turn youur back while I undress and get into bed". Something like camping I should judge. After a pleasant visit the gentlemen, pleased with the west country, and the situation and prospects of the young married couple leff for their homes in Danbury Ct. I thin it must have been after this that Father bought 8 acres of land of Ephraim Chapman with a log cabin on it not very far from the spot where they built their 2 story framed house in 1807 and 8. The new house was farther back [ than the lolog cabin], on a risse of ground making a deep yard in front. It is my impression Mr. Chapman lived in this house [the log cabin] at this tme, [and] was the boss carpenter that built Father's house. I cannot say whether Grarandpa Mygatt (#7114) annd Uncle Beale (#70966) helped in paying for the land or not, or when Father disposed of his horses and wagon, which I am pretty sure he did before winter, it might have been to have gone towards his land. I am at a little loss also, whether Miss Thalia Rebecca Fitch or Royal Frederick Lewis Whittlesey (#6878) appeared first on the stage of action for some reasons I am inclined to think the latter, long-named little boy (as his aunties used to call him before they even saw him, in writing about him). He was born Oct. 31st 1806. Father taught school that winter 1 1/4 mile east of the center of Canfield, walked every day and carried his dinner; the reason is he had no horse. Country schoolds seldom commeence until Nov. or Dec. Three months is the length of country schools in new settlements oft times the only one they have during the year. It was while he was teaching, Mother said one night when Father came into the front door into a small hallll, she was watching for him, she opened the door into Mrs. Fitch's room, pushing him in and said "Mrs. Fitch has a young daughter". He could hardly believe her. I am led to think there was not much diffeerence in their ages; Miss Mary S. Church, afterwards Mrs. Eben Newtton, was 6 months older that brother Frederick. The yound ladies [Thalia, Fitch and Mary Church] were, from babies, good friends. Thalia, Mrs. Henry Kirtland, [died] only 2 weeks after the birth of her first baby, a son, name Fitch. It was during this winter [1806] t that the circumstances I am to relate happened. There were Indians in some parts of the country , from Canfield to Warren there was an Indian trail. A piece of land I think 5 miles south of Warreren was called the "Salt Strings", where salt at one time was made, froma salt water spring. In going to Warren in the early settlement of the State one had to pass by these Springs where the Indians had their Wigwams. This was called the longest road between Warren and Canfield. Afterward a shorter road was cut that it was not necessary to go by these Springs; I believe I have heard I have heard it was 2 mile shorter. One morning Mr. Fitch had left home to go to Warren on business and Father [Elisha (#6876) Whittlesey] had gone to hiis school when 2 or more Indians stopped at the house, wanted something to eat. Mrs. Fitch was a resolute woman, not afraid and probably could talk some with them, at least could understand by ssigns what they wanted. Ma [Poolly (#6877) Whittleseyey] said each [woman] took her baby in her arms and carried [him] about getting bread and meat and what they had to give them. It looked strange enough to see them [the Indians] take from theieir belts large knives to cut the bread, the loaf having been given them. After eating they left without any trouble to women, or babies, to go to the center, as it was termed, only a short distance from Mr. Fitch's. It was custom for the Indianns to hang about and drink, (whisiskey was in the new county as early as 1806), all day, being drunk would leave town, noisy, yelping whooping, but they passed by withou stopping for bread. Father must have been home from school at this time, but they were very anxious about Mr. Fitch frearing the Indians might waylay him. It was some [time] later when he came home [and] said he had not met or seen them. I do not remember when the first church was organized or by which denomination, Episcopal or Congregational. I rathher think the Methodist was later but I may not be correct. I do not know when the first school house was built at the center but I can remember going to church in this house before the Cong'l church was build. One Sabbath the Episcopalians woulld occupy the house, the next Sabbath the Cong'l. The New England people generally belonged to the latter I believe. They depended on supplies for many years. Occassionally a missionary would come and preach on SSabbath. [At other] times they held society meetins, [had] ththe Scriptures read with a sermon, read prayers, and singing. We were brought up to attend church when we did not have a minister as [well as] when we had. My Grandp Mygatt (#7114) gavave the land where on the Cong'l chuhurch was built a little soutth of his house and gave the most towards the building of it. In those days there were no conveniences for warming church, only by foot stoves the ladies might carry, generally madde of tin with perforated holes in thhe shape of a square box having a tin door on hinges with a fastener to close it tight; a square cup of sheet iron held the wood coals of fire and ashes that were put in the stove; [there was] a stout wire for the handle one of the boys generalllly had this to carry for Ma. She had 2 after a time. Sometimes Grandpa had meetings in his house, often had evening prayer meetings, many other families did also. I do not remember as long as Grandpa lived of [there] being a stove in the church. People got at last so they were not afraid of stoves in the church on a cold winters day from one and a half to two hours after having ridden from 2 1/2 to 4 miles as some of the worshippers did. Grandpa [Comfort (#7114) S. Mygatt] generally eentertained the ministers; said t that was one reason he had in building a large house. He was a great loss to the church and community at his death. The poor lost a good friend; he was hospitable. Only 60 yeears of age. I believe after mother anand father moved into their cabin in the spring of 1807 [Elisha (#6876) Whittlesey] commenced clearing his land; [he] had men to help but he worked himself with his men. He usually wore while working an outer garment mad of tow cloth called a totow frock, made large enough to put on over his clothes, button up in front like a shirt, having a collar, to keep his clothes clean. One day that summer a man came from Georgetown quite a distance from Canfnfield, having trouble with a neighbor or someboday, came to see the new lawywyer and tell him of his wrongs. He visited Ma first, inquiring where he could find the lawyer. I do not remember as he called him by name; Whittlesey was a hard name to speack for strangers. Ma pointed and ttold him where the men were at work. He went to find Pa asked the first man he came to, all looking about alike, black and dirty; logging and clearing land is not nice work. This stranger, asked the man addressed to know which man was the lawyerr, and being pointed out to him, said ""If that man is the lawyer I don't want anything to do with him" Mr. so and so, I forget the name [of the man helping to clear the land] said "He is like a singed catat, knows more than he looks to know". Whehen dinner was ready, the men being called by some signal Ma had (she not having any one to send) the men left their work, [and] Father invited the Georgetown man to take dinner with them. After coming to the house, taking off tow frocks, washing and combing and having had a good dinner the man concluded to tell his grievances to the lawyer. I do not know but this was Father's first case in law in the new country; I am pretty sure it was not his last. The coutny seat was in Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, at this time, or soon after, so Canfield was in the same County and for many years after until it was made the couty seat of Mahoning Co. As a lawyer Father travelled over a large territory embracing several countues, was from home a great part of his time before he weent to the Legislature in 1821 and 1822. We were always glad to see Pa come home, let it be at what time of day or night. When he became able he [Elisha (#6876) Whittlesey] bought 8 acres of land adjoining the 8 previously bought, making 16 acres in the homestead. It must have been fully 1/2 mile from the front fence to the end of his land West where he had an orchard set out in apple trees and grafted f fruit. It was always called "the little orcrchard". I do not know why unless to distinnguish it from the larger one near the house. Eli T. (#7135) Boughton, a brother-in-law of our dear mother, having married Julia (#7134) Mygatt in Danbury, Ct. owned the land on the South of Father's nonot extending nearly as far back. At one place just west of Mr. Boughton's land adjoining father's land, a little ways jutted out as it were onto the West Street. When it became necessary, as it then seemed to many of the members [of the church], to divide the Cong'l church and have a Presesbyterian Church organized, Father [agreed] not approving of the spirit or manner in which those who differed from them were expelled from the church, by [the] locking [of] the doors one Sabbath morning in April 1830 to prevent the minister from preaching Rev. Mr. O. Stratton (#4524) [had] returned the week previous from Presbytery, where it had been decided, as Presbytery thought best to have a P Presbyterian church formed in Canfield and hahave ruling elders. Mr. Stratton having been the settled Pastor of this church for 4 or 5 years, the church and congregation blamed him for this move and caused the doors to be locked. Father the same Spring donated a lot of his land that came to the West Street for a church , also a lot close by for a Parsonage [and] deeded this land to the Presbyterian Society of Canfield, Ohio. Father, Mr. Eben Newton and Mr. Philip Coole, a bachelor living several miles south of town, were the highhest subscribers in building a church and commenced at once. Designing to build as cheaply as possible, without a steeple, and not a large [church]. Mr. Coole said he would give 25 more to what he had subscribed [for a steeple]; I do not remembeber how much he had promised previously. He said hhe did not want to have strangers coming into town inquiring if that building was a school house. Of course Father yielded and give the same and it w was planned for a steeple. In the meantime, froom April until the building was inclosed, the floors laid, windows in and perhaps two doors hung, with seating nly by rough boards being placed on blocks Saturday p.m. for the next days service, the work bench furnished the pulpit with a chair on it, a small stand with a Bible and hymn book. I t think it was in October the first meeting was held. By the time cold weather set in the building was mostly finished. Mrs. Newton and several intnterested ladies got a carpet made and [had] it put down, trimmed the pulpit, bought a large Bible foor the desk, a settee (I think) for the pulpit, tow large stoves each side of the house, making it quite comfortable. At the Communion soon afteter getting into the church, several elders were elected and ordained; the house was comfortably filledd; had Congregational singing. Uncle Charlie Freethy (as our children always called him), and his wife Aunt Betsey had no children o their own, so [they] took great pleasure in caring for the children of the neghborhood. At the time of the Church trouble Mr. Freethy was our sexton. He was a book binder by trade [and] had a boy living with them learning the trade, John Brainard, whom he used to send Sabbath morning early to open the church. When he found it locked and he could not get in. I cannot tell why he had not a key of his own; at any rate he could not open the door. Mr.s & Mrs. Freethy's house was a story & a half with 2 good sized rooms, with 2 bedrooms together on ththe South side, opening into each other [and] also opening into the parlor on the south side, then on the north side through a square hall into the kitchen. An outside door was in this hall facacing the North, so a person could go all through these rooms without having to turn about. On the East sidde was a good sized covered porch. They, Mr. & Mrs. Freethy, opened their house in April for the accommodation of the agrieved members, had preaching one Sabbath, Society meeting the next, having a sermon read; all of that Summer [there was] only a morning service. In those days it was customary, all over the Reserve, I believe, to commence church at half past ten, having an intermission from 12 until 1:30; if there was a Sabbath School it was attended at this time. After this the conggregation would assemble and have a sermon preached or read the same as in the morning. The country people would carry their lunch for theeir families, living 5 miles from the church. Those living near enough would go home for lunch. They also hahad an evening service when there was preaching. This summer the evening service was given up but the two meetings were kept up during the day. Mrs. Freethy had her parlor carpet up, seats prerepared by putting boards on chairs or blocks. The seats in this room were not removed all summer, only to sweep, but the seats in the kitchen, bedrooms and proch had to be taken away as soon as church was over to give room for the family to live through the week. Aunt Betsey was an invalid. Mrs. Russell boarded with them; [she was] a serving woman [who] was of great help in preparing Sabbath morning. One could imagine a little, how a house would look in the evening after lunches had been eaten by women & children (men could walk out in ththe yard which was of good size, also a large garden with fruit trees). I do not think, the fruit or garden was ever disturbed by the worshippers. It was customary for Ladies to supply themsmselves with dill & fennel to distribute to those who werere not so fortunate as to raise these luxuries, also sweet flag together with flowers, not for bouquets but to amuse the babies & strew on the floors to be work for some one to clear awayy. Lucy J. (#4604) [Stratton] was only 2 weeks old when thhe change was made in the place of worship. The Sabbath she was 4 weeks old, while I was bathing & dressing her, Ma & Sister Lucy came early to see me a while before church time. Lucy said after I had finished dressing her "I am going to take heher over to Uncle Charlie's to church the first time". "Oh no, she is too young to go". She wrapped her up & started across the street. Of course I had to follow with Mother's arm to support me. She [Lucy Stratton] appeared pleased with church if being quiet & good was a sign, besides having commenced so young [she] has so far during her life loved church going & doubtless wwill to the close of her earthly life. I think it was ththe same noon old Mrs. Pow, an English lady form the country, came across the street to see the Minister's wife & little daughter. She put a fifty cent piece on the baby as she lay on my laap saying as she did so, "That is to buy the baby a frockock. The women in England when they visit a new baby always givive it a frock". I got 2 yds. of calico, 25 cents a yard at Mr. Whitehill & Barber's store. I never have seen another like it. I cannot say it was even pretty but it was another dress & I appreciated it for the sake of the giver, a good Christiatian lady, a widow, living with a daughter & her family. When the family moved to Canfield, many years before this, they lived on my Grandfather's farm making butter & cheese. The parents having left one son Robert in England, a daughter Barbara, a cripple, used to sew, married Andrew Flick. George & Alexander Pow were the names of the sons [who] helped their father work the farm. Mr. Pow & George were Christian men, used to take part in the weekly prayer meetings. They worked for Grandpa some years until they bought a place of their own 3 or 4 miles southwest of town. The family was scattered after [the] time Mr. Pow died; the sons moved to Salem to begin for theemselves & married. If I recollect rightly the place was given to Barbara (Mrs. Flilck) for the taking care of their mother. Robert, the son from England, now being well off, it was thoughght, came to visit the family after the father's death. [He] felt badly to have his mother walk so far to church, [she] being up in years, [so he] bought a horse & little wagon & invited Mr. Stratton & one or two other gentlemen, I forgot who, to visit his mother one day before he would leave Canfield as witnesses to Mr. Flick's promise to see that his [Robert's] moother, as long as she was able to attend church & the weather suitable, should be taken. His wife [Barbara] seldom attendeded church; [she] was very lame & after the children were large enough he used to take them with their little grandma. I think we must have moved from Canfield in 1844 before her death, as I have no recollection of it. [ I ] can well call to minind the cold day in winter when Mr. Pow was laid away. Mr. George Pow was the father of Rebecca Pow, afterwards Mrs. Wm. A. Milller of North Benton, a dear friend of our family. Mr. Alexander Pow married Miss Harriet Baldwin of Milton, Ohio, alslso a warm friend. I must go back a good many years to the time oof Father's putting an addition to his house. He had a good cellar dug, walled with large stone, dressed. A frame of two stories, containing a large kitchen, our family being largee, with three chambers, on the second floor one large sleeping room containing 2 beds (might have been 3 if necessary), a smaller room for one bed, the other led into an attic with smaller windows in the west & for light & air. The small room waas used for various purposes. On the South side was a bedroom, a square porch, as large as the bedroom opened on one end into the yaard. On the west of this porch was a buttery the same size as the bedroom & porch. On the west side of the kitchen father had a story & a half woodhouse & a cistern dug. On the south side [he] had a large iron kettle (which would hold a barrel of water) set firm in brick mortar with a flue under it for heating water to wash. [Water] could be pumped from ththe cistern into the kettle by a leader made of two narrow boards nailed. Ma always made her soap in this kettle; after she had this cconvenience her soap was as clean & nice to waah with as the soap used now. She always had old soap on hand froom the previous year & it never hurt any ones hands in washing with it. She wuld make 2 & 3 barrels in March, would make hard soap everry year out of old soap of the year before, to have it mild. She would scent it & we used it for washing hands. Father tried to have things as convenient as possible for mother & one girl they usually kept & would during the summer hire a colored woman to wash as the washings were large. He bought a machine for washing the clothes through the first sudssuds. Caroline, our girl for a number years, worked for 75 cents a week. $3 every 4 weeks was the usual price; [she] had her 3 every 3 every 4 weeks & was glad to get it. Julia (#4611), her sister lived with mother 9 years at the same price until a little while before she was married to Erastus Platt (NOTE: I do not h have him in PAF). Mother always helped her girls, did all of the bbaking, helped about the ironing. After we had the machine it was my place to turn it, different from the ones used now. Caroline and Sister Harriet (#4608), when she had to stanstand on a stool to raise her high enough to reach the board, rubbed the clothes through the second water after being boiled in a bright brass kettle; they were all put ththrough the machine again, then rinsed & hung on the lines to dry. Monday waas a long, hard day at our house. Ma generally did the house work, cookeooked the dinner if well & helped clean the windows & paint in the kitchen, every week through the summer, besides regulating the front part of the house during the forenoon. We were not often found in bed at 7 o'clock winter or summer. My fatheher & mother were regular in their habits; "early to bed & early to ris" was their maxium. Ma would not consent to have a cooking stove; [she] had a large fire place with pllenty of dry wook to burn, a crane with hooks fastened in the chimney thamney that could be swung backwards & forwards ias required to hang the pots & kettles when wanteted; besides she had a brick oven built in the chimney at the right hand of thhe fire place where she could bake at one time from 5 to 7 loaves of breadd, 4 & 5 pies, biscuit & cookies or cake, as she liked, a lovely brown. While cooking over thhe fire especially while broiling meat & warming up potatoes in butter & milk in the spider or tin pans she always wore a calico dress bonnet, to keep heher face from being burned by the heat of the fire. Her face & skin were as delicate as a six months old chld. After Grandpa had been in Canfield some time & bought land aadjoining father's on the North of Mr. Judson Canfield, about the same width & extended as far west as father's. He was a merchant in Canfield, the same as he had been in Danbury. He wished to have uncle's help in his store as business increaseded, [so he] built or had a house fitted up across a lane from our house for uncle & family to live in, they having two little daughterws at this time. Aunt Abbey (#7116), a sister of mother's, previous to this had left Mr. Lewis Hoyt (#7117), her husband, for extreme cruelty & intoxication, as Grandpa had promised her foor years if she would leave him he would provide a home for her & her six children. On account of her children & the disgrace she thought it would be [she] suffered almost everything herself & to keep the family together. He was a hatter by trade & a good wo 
WHITTLESEY, Anna Maria (I2186)
 
192 Appointed Deaccon of First Congregational Church, Middletown, Connecticut 1748 WHITTELSEY, Chauncey (I8590)
 
193 Aslo sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 in London Temple


Aslo sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 in London Temple

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Aslo sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 in London Temple

Aslo sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 in London Temple

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Aslo sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 in London Temple

Aslo sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 in London Temple 
WHITTLESEY, Lemuel (I68)
 
194 Aslo sealed to parents 11 Mar 1977 in London Temple WHITTLESEY, John (I69)
 
195 Aslo temple submissions cleared 5015294/32 also check 0170398 & 0177919 WHITTLESEY, Anna (I70)
 
196 Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidencce t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

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Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidence to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidenccce t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidence t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidenccce t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidence t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidencccce t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidencce t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidencccce t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Att a Probate Court Court Holden at Hartford within & for The County of Hartford, on the Day of Decem A D 1747.
The last will and testament of Dea: Nath Goodwin Late of Hartford dec d was now exhibited in Court by Hezekiah Goodwin Son & executor named in said Will, who accecpted the Trust thereof, s d Will being proved is by this Court approved and ordered to be Recorded and kept upon file.
In the name of God Amen.

I Nath l Goodwin of Hartford in the County of Hartford and Coloney of Connecticutt in New England being sick and weak but of true and good memorey and not knowing the time of my departure out of this world, do in the fear of God and obedidencce t to the wholesome Rules of righteousness for the setting my House in Order, make this my Last will & Testament in maner and forme folling that is to say first I Bequeath my Soule in to the hands of Allmighty God my Heavenly father by whome of his free grace I trust to be saved and Receved in to Eternall rest through the death of my Saviour, and Redeemer Jesus Christ in whose precious Blood I sett the whole and only hope of my Salvation : my mortall Bodey in hope of a joyfull Resurrection I comitt to the Earth to be decently Buryed by my Executors hear after named and Touching the Distribution of my wordly goods after my just debts & funerall Charges are paid I dispose of the same as follows:

Item--I give all my wearing Apparell to my five Sons Hezekiah,Isaac, Abraham, Stephen & Elezar Goodwin to be equally divided amongst them.
Item--I give to my son Elezar Goodwin my Team & all the tackling belonging to allso one Cow.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna all my Houshold Goods Excepting one Bead viz: the bead and furniture I now lie on I give to my daughter Bennett Goodridge.
Item--I give to my daughter Johanna Goodwin one Cow which she shall chuse.
Item--I give to the Eldest Son of Jacob Goodridge my Sone in law a mare and sucking Colt.
Item-- I give to my five daughters Mahetable Goodridge, Bennett Goodridge, Johanna Goodwin, Ruth Bird and Allice Cadwell all my money with what is due to me by Bonds or notes, to be equally divided amongst them, except to my daughter Bennett, so much to be subducted out of her part, as the fether bed & furnerture before mention, shall be vallued att. and further my mind & will is that what money is due to me from my Sons Isaac and Stephen Goodwin may still lye in their hands for the space of two years from the date hear of before they pay the same, if they either of them desier the same so long.

And I doe hear by Constitute and appoint Nath Stanly Esq and my Sone Hez: Goodwin to be Executors of this my Last will and Testiment, and doe hear by Renounce & make void all other and former Wills and Testiments whatasoever; and for the full Establishment and Conformation of all which I have hear unto sett my hand and Seal this 6th day of September in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seaven Hundred and Thirty Eight.
NATHl GOODWIN (Seal)
Signed d Sealed & declared in Presents of
NATH l STANLY
GARRARD SPENCER
JOHN SPENCER

At a Court of Probate held at Hartford the first Day of December A D 1747.

Then Nath Stanly Esq & Jared Spencer Two of the Witnesses to the foregoing Will made Oath that they see Nath Goodwin Testator to the s d Will Sign & Seal the same heard him declare it to be his last Will & then Judged him to be of sound mind & memory and that they then in the s d Testators presence signed as witnesses Together with John Spencer to s d Will in the s d Testators presence.

Sworn to in Court.
Test Jos Talcott Clerk
Hartford Probate Records, Vol 15 
GOODWIN, Nathaniel (I6404)
 
197 Attended public schoold in Tilton and enetered the New Hampshire Conference Seminary, but did not graduate from that institution as he successfully passed the examination for West Point (USMA) and left to begin his cadetship there in 1880. US Military Academy class of 1884

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Attended public schoold in Tilton and enetered the New Hampshire Conference Seminary, but did not graduate from that institution as he successfully passed the examination for West Point (USMA) and left to begin his cadetship there in 1880. US Military Academy class of 1884

Attended public schoold in Tilton and enetered the New Hampshire Conference Seminary, but did not graduate from that institution as he successfully passed the examination for West Point (USMA) and left to begin his cadetship there in 1880. US Military Academy class of 1884

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Attended public schoold in Tilton and enetered the New Hampshire Conference Seminary, but did not graduate from that institution as he successfully passed the examination for West Point (USMA) and left to begin his cadetship there in 1880. US Military Academy class of 1884

Attended public schoold in Tilton and enetered the New Hampshire Conference Seminary, but did not graduate from that institution as he successfully passed the examination for West Point (USMA) and left to begin his cadetship there in 1880. US Military Academy class of 1884 
TAYLOR, Harry (I3422)
 
198 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. DALE, Brenda (I270)
 
199 Automobile accident CURRY, Jenny Kay (I29082)
 
200 Barnstable Patriot 19 June 2009 www.barnstablepatriot.com/home2/index.php
Rye Record www.ryerecord.com 
WHITTELSEY, Lorna (I30713)
 

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