Whittlesey-WhittelseyFamilyHistory
Genealogy of the Whittlesey-Whittelsey family based upon the 1855 Memorials of the Whittlesey Family, the 1898, 1941 and 1992 Whittelsey/Whittlesey Genealogies along with input from family members. In addition there is information on the Descendants of Seth Savage of Berlin, Connecticut
Additional family lineage of Willis Savage Whittlesey III can be found at cravendescendants.org; brownedescendants.org and frisbiedescendants.org
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Solomon WHITTLESEY

Solomon WHITTLESEY

Male 1786 - 1871  (84 years)

 Set As Default Person    

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Solomon WHITTLESEY  [1
    Born 30 Apr 1786  Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    AFN GKWN-8K 
    Died 22 Feb 1871  Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    WAC 7 Jun 1946  IFALL Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Baptism (LDS) 23 Jan 1960  SLAKE Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Endowment (LDS) 3 Feb 1960  SLAKE Find all individuals with events at this location 
    FamilySearch Id L78Q-Q2J 
    _FSFTID L78Q-Q2J 
    _UID B180E7A9F66DD5118D2D40D302C101E47F5C 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I60  John Whittelsey (1623-1704) Descendants
    Last Modified 18 Nov 2014 

    Father Ancestors Eliphalet WHITTLESEY,   b. 2 Jul 1748, Newington, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jan 1823, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother Ancestors Comfort WALLER,   b. 15 Nov 1750, Kent, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Apr 1825, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Married 25 Dec 1771 
    Family ID F23  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Ancestors Olive KIRBY,   b. 1784, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Oct 1823, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years) 
    Married 6 May 1811  Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
    Married: 1x1. Mary Ann WHITTLESEY,   b. 6 Feb 1812, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1895, Alexandria, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    Married: 1x2. Edmund WHITTLESEY,   b. 17 Jun 1814, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Mar 1895, Pecatonica, Winnebago, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
    Married: 2x3. Eliphalet WHITTLESEY,   b. 7 Apr 1817, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1903, Manson, Calhoun, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
    Married: 1x4. Calista Curtis WHITTELSEY,   b. 29 May 1819, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Apr 1874, Greenville, Montcalm, Michigan, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
    Family ID F2382  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Sarah SHERMAN,   b. 23 Mar 1796, New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Apr 1873  (Age 77 years) 
    Married 1824  Huron, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Sealed to Spouse (LDS) 23 Nov 1982  OAKLA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. David WHITTLESEY,   b. 15 Sep 1825, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1844  (Age 18 years)
     2. Solomon WHITTLESEY,   b. 27 Feb 1827, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1842  (Age 14 years)
    Married: 1x3. Pamelia WHITTLESEY,   b. 24 May 1829, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 1917, Olmsted Falls, Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
    Married: 1x4. Cyrus L WHITTLESEY,   b. 8 Aug 1831, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Married: 1x5. Sarah WHITTLESEY,   b. 11 Mar 1833, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. May 1890, Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     6. John M WHITTLESEY,   b. 19 Apr 1837, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1838  (Age 0 years)
     7. James Monroe WHITTLESEY,   b. 10 Nov 1840, Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Mar 1842  (Age 1 years)
    Family ID F2383  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to hide
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 30 Apr 1786 - Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 6 May 1811 - Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1824 - Huron, Ohio, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 22 Feb 1871 - Brownhelm, Lorain, Ohio, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. Brownhelm Twp., Lorain Co.

      SOLOMON WHITTLESEY. One of the earliest and most prominent settlers of Brownhelm, was Solomon Whittlesey. We find him frequently mentioned in J. H. Fairchild's "History of Brownhelm." The exact date of his arrival is not given, but his name appears in connection with early religious matters in the year 1819. It is stated in the work above referred to that "The church was organized June 10, 1819, at the house of Solomon Whittlesey, and consisted of sixteen members, seven men and nine women." Again referring to Mr. Whittlesey, President Fairchild says: "Thrifty men pursued the business of hunting as a pastime. The only man in town, perhaps, to whom it afforded prof­itable business in any sense, was Solomon Whittlesey. Other professional hunters were shiftless men, to whom hunting was a mere passion, having something of the attraction of gambling. Mr. Whittlesey did not neglect his farm, but he knew every haunt and path of the deer and the turkey, and was often in their track by day and by night. He is with us to-day, (1867) and reports the killing of one bear, two wolves, twenty wild cats, almost one hundred and fifty deer, and smaller game too numerous to specify. One branch of his business was bee hunting, a pursuit which required a keen eye, good judgment and practice. The method of the hunt was to raise an odor in the forest, by placing honey comb on a hot stone, and in the vicinity another piece of comb charged with honey. The bees were attracted by the smell, and having gorged themselves with the honey, they took a bee line for their tree. This line the hun­ter observed and marked by two or more trees in range. He then took another station, not on this line, and went through the same operation. These two lines, if fortunately selected, would converge upon the bee tree, and could be followed out by a pocket compass. The tree, when found, was marked by the hunter with his initials, and could be cut down by him, at the proper time." Mr. Whittlesey is also accredited with having been among the first in Brownhelm township to manufacture pearl-ash, which he did quite extensively. He seems to have been one of the most industrious and energetic of the pioneers, and a worthy man in every respect. He died Febru­ary 22, 1871, aged eighty-four years, nine months and twenty-two days; his excellent widow survived him about two years, she departing this life on the 26th of April, 1873, aged seventy-one years, one month and three days.

      (Source: History of Lorain County, Ohio, Williams Brothers, Philadelphia, 1879, p. 233.)

      -- MERGED NOTE ------------

      BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. Brownhelm Twp., Lorain Co.

      SOLOMON WHITTLESEY. One of the earliest and most prominent settlers of Brownhelm, was Solomon Whittlesey. We find him frequently mentioned in J. H. Fairchild's "History of Brownhelm." The exact date of his arrival is not given, but his name appears in connection with early religious matters in the year 1819. It is stated in the work above referred to that "The church was organized June 10, 1819, at the house of Solomon Whittlesey, and consisted of sixteen members, seven men and nine women." Again referring to Mr. Whittlesey, President Fairchild says: "Thrifty men pursued the business of hunting as a pastime. The only man in town, perhaps, to whom it afforded prof­itable business in any sense, was Solomon Whittlesey. Other professional hunters were shiftless men, to whom hunting was a mere passion, having something of the attraction of gambling. Mr. Whittlesey did not neglect his farm, but he knew every haunt and path of the deer and the turkey, and was often in their track by day and by night. He is with us to-day, (1867) and reports the killing of one bear, two wolves, twenty wild cats, almost one hundred and fifty deer, and smaller game too numerous to specify. One branch of his business was bee hunting, a pursuit which required a keen eye, good judgment and practice. The method of the hunt was to raise an odor in the forest, by placing honey comb on a hot stone, and in the vicinity another piece of comb charged with honey. The bees were attracted by the smell, and having gorged themselves with the honey, they took a bee line for their tree. This line the hun­ter observed and marked by two or more trees in range. He then took another station, not on this line, and went through the same operation. These two lines, if fortunately selected, would converge upon the bee tree, and could be followed out by a pocket compass. The tree, when found, was marked by the hunter with his initials, and could be cut down by him, at the proper time." Mr. Whittlesey is also accredited with having been among the first in Brownhelm township to manufacture pearl-ash, which he did quite extensively. He seems to have been one of the most industrious and energetic of the pioneers, and a worthy man in every respect. He died Febru­ary 22, 1871, aged eighty-four years, nine months and twenty-two days; his excellent widow survived him about two years, she departing this life on the 26th of April, 1873, aged seventy-one years, one month and three days.

      (Source: History of Lorain County, Ohio, Williams Brothers, Philadelphia, 1879, p. 233.)

      BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. Brownhelm Twp., Lorain Co.

      SOLOMON WHITTLESEY. One of the earliest and most prominent settlers of Brownhelm, was Solomon Whittlesey. We find him frequently mentioned in J. H. Fairchild's "History of Brownhelm." The exact date of his arrival is not given, but his name appears in connection with early religious matters in the year 1819. It is stated in the work above referred to that "The church was organized June 10, 1819, at the house of Solomon Whittlesey, and consisted of sixteen members, seven men and nine women." Again referring to Mr. Whittlesey, President Fairchild says: "Thrifty men pursued the business of hunting as a pastime. The only man in town, perhaps, to whom it afforded prof­itable business in any sense, was Solomon Whittlesey. Other professional hunters were shiftless men, to whom hunting was a mere passion, having something of the attraction of gambling. Mr. Whittlesey did not neglect his farm, but he knew every haunt and path of the deer and the turkey, and was often in their track by day and by night. He is with us to-day, (1867) and reports the killing of one bear, two wolves, twenty wild cats, almost one hundred and fifty deer, and smaller game too numerous to specify. One branch of his business was bee hunting, a pursuit which required a keen eye, good judgment and practice. The method of the hunt was to raise an odor in the forest, by placing honey comb on a hot stone, and in the vicinity another piece of comb charged with honey. The bees were attracted by the smell, and having gorged themselves with the honey, they took a bee line for their tree. This line the hun­ter observed and marked by two or more trees in range. He then took another station, not on this line, and went through the same operation. These two lines, if fortunately selected, would converge upon the bee tree, and could be followed out by a pocket compass. The tree, when found, was marked by the hunter with his initials, and could be cut down by him, at the proper time." Mr. Whittlesey is also accredited with having been among the first in Brownhelm township to manufacture pearl-ash, which he did quite extensively. He seems to have been one of the most industrious and energetic of the pioneers, and a worthy man in every respect. He died Febru­ary 22, 1871, aged eighty-four years, nine months and twenty-two days; his excellent widow survived him about two years, she departing this life on the 26th of April, 1873, aged seventy-one years, one month and three days.

      (Source: History of Lorain County, Ohio, Williams Brothers, Philadelphia, 1879, p. 233.)

      -- MERGED NOTE ------------

      BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. Brownhelm Twp., Lorain Co.

      SOLOMON WHITTLESEY. One of the earliest and most prominent settlers of Brownhelm, was Solomon Whittlesey. We find him frequently mentioned in J. H. Fairchild's "History of Brownhelm." The exact date of his arrival is not given, but his name appears in connection with early religious matters in the year 1819. It is stated in the work above referred to that "The church was organized June 10, 1819, at the house of Solomon Whittlesey, and consisted of sixteen members, seven men and nine women." Again referring to Mr. Whittlesey, President Fairchild says: "Thrifty men pursued the business of hunting as a pastime. The only man in town, perhaps, to whom it afforded prof­itable business in any sense, was Solomon Whittlesey. Other professional hunters were shiftless men, to whom hunting was a mere passion, having something of the attraction of gambling. Mr. Whittlesey did not neglect his farm, but he knew every haunt and path of the deer and the turkey, and was often in their track by day and by night. He is with us to-day, (1867) and reports the killing of one bear, two wolves, twenty wild cats, almost one hundred and fifty deer, and smaller game too numerous to specify. One branch of his business was bee hunting, a pursuit which required a keen eye, good judgment and practice. The method of the hunt was to raise an odor in the forest, by placing honey comb on a hot stone, and in the vicinity another piece of comb charged with honey. The bees were attracted by the smell, and having gorged themselves with the honey, they took a bee line for their tree. This line the hun­ter observed and marked by two or more trees in range. He then took another station, not on this line, and went through the same operation. These two lines, if fortunately selected, would converge upon the bee tree, and could be followed out by a pocket compass. The tree, when found, was marked by the hunter with his initials, and could be cut down by him, at the proper time." Mr. Whittlesey is also accredited with having been among the first in Brownhelm township to manufacture pearl-ash, which he did quite extensively. He seems to have been one of the most industrious and energetic of the pioneers, and a worthy man in every respect. He died Febru­ary 22, 1871, aged eighty-four years, nine months and twenty-two days; his excellent widow survived him about two years, she departing this life on the 26th of April, 1873, aged seventy-one years, one month and three days.

      (Source: History of Lorain County, Ohio, Williams Brothers, Philadelphia, 1879, p. 233.)

      BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. Brownhelm Twp., Lorain Co.

      SOLOMON WHITTLESEY. One of the earliest and most prominent settlers of Brownhelm, was Solomon Whittlesey. We find him frequently mentioned in J. H. Fairchild's "History of Brownhelm." The exact date of his arrival is not given, but his name appears in connection with early religious matters in the year 1819. It is stated in the work above referred to that "The church was organized June 10, 1819, at the house of Solomon Whittlesey, and consisted of sixteen members, seven men and nine women." Again referring to Mr. Whittlesey, President Fairchild says: "Thrifty men pursued the business of hunting as a pastime. The only man in town, perhaps, to whom it afforded prof­itable business in any sense, was Solomon Whittlesey. Other professional hunters were shiftless men, to whom hunting was a mere passion, having something of the attraction of gambling. Mr. Whittlesey did not neglect his farm, but he knew every haunt and path of the deer and the turkey, and was often in their track by day and by night. He is with us to-day, (1867) and reports the killing of one bear, two wolves, twenty wild cats, almost one hundred and fifty deer, and smaller game too numerous to specify. One branch of his business was bee hunting, a pursuit which required a keen eye, good judgment and practice. The method of the hunt was to raise an odor in the forest, by placing honey comb on a hot stone, and in the vicinity another piece of comb charged with honey. The bees were attracted by the smell, and having gorged themselves with the honey, they took a bee line for their tree. This line the hun­ter observed and marked by two or more trees in range. He then took another station, not on this line, and went through the same operation. These two lines, if fortunately selected, would converge upon the bee tree, and could be followed out by a pocket compass. The tree, when found, was marked by the hunter with his initials, and could be cut down by him, at the proper time." Mr. Whittlesey is also accredited with having been among the first in Brownhelm township to manufacture pearl-ash, which he did quite extensively. He seems to have been one of the most industrious and energetic of the pioneers, and a worthy man in every respect. He died Febru­ary 22, 1871, aged eighty-four years, nine months and twenty-two days; his excellent widow survived him about two years, she departing this life on the 26th of April, 1873, aged seventy-one years, one month and three days.

      (Source: History of Lorain County, Ohio, Williams Brothers, Philadelphia, 1879, p. 233.)

  • Sources 
    1. [S17] Book: Genealogy of the Whittlesey-Whittelsey Family, Third Edition.

    2. [S17] Book: Genealogy of the Whittlesey-Whittelsey Family, Third Edition, p 107.